Lifestyle Medicine & Preventing Illness

As a complementary therapist I constantly chat with clients about lifestyle changes which will keep them healthy and well.  My clients often share with me the positive changes they have made and how much better they feel.

Sometimes this can be a difficult subject to open people up to.  The Western medical profession rarely give health advice, they tend to focus on treating the symptoms.  Most often they don’t even try to finding the cause of the problem and try to put that right.  The exception being the harm caused by smoking or obesity.  Even here they tell you to reduce it as it harms, without any guide how to do it.

Patients receiving medical treatment are often unaware of Lifestyle Medicine so never give it a try.  We so need to education people around us.  We need a David Attenborough for healthy living!

Lifestyle medicine has been reported to help NCD’s (Non communicable diseases) .  These include heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, muscle pain, liver disease etc.

What is Lifestyle Medicine?

It means ditching inactivity, unhealthy eating, smoking, excessive alcohol, reducing chronic stress and there is a big focus on the negative affects of loneliness.

We can change behaviour to reverse the progression of NCD’s with

  • Healthy eating
  • Physical activity
  • Relaxation & stress management
  • Better sleep
  • Avoiding risky substances

With the pressures on the NHS and our ageing population we need to urgently address this.

If you are interested in reducing smoking or weight-loss, are close to South Birmingham and might want to consider hypnotherapy get in touch for a chat.  Hypnotherapy is a very safe therapy.

I also offer coaching, reflexology and mindfulness therapy to help you kick start your Lifestyle Medicine programme.

 

A tonne of research is available on the benefits of Lifestyle Medicine:

Kaavik et al, 2010; ACLM, 2018; Minich and Bland, 2013; Knowler et al, 2002; Brotons et al (2012; Link & Phelan, 1995; Cornus et al, 2000; Steptoe et al, 1999

Thank you to Benjamin Low of UCL who inspired me to write this after reading his essay in International Therapist.